Maryanna Meade Interview

Interview with Maryanna Meade- Oral History from UMW History on Vimeo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maryanna Meade was born March 10th, 1920 to a small family in Pueblo, Colorado. As child, Maryanna was fortunate to attend school for an education. After graduating from High School, Maryanna attended nursing school and met her husband on duty. Maryanna enjoyed traveling with her husband when he was not in service overseas. While her husband was away Maryanna worked as a nurse at two hospitals and worked on planes at the Douglas Aircraft Company. When her husband Charles returned from his service overseas she moved back home to Colorado.

 

Maryanna Meade Interview- PDF

Transcript:

Interview with Maryanna Meade
Interviewed by: Sarah Tagg

Transcriber: Sarah Tagg

[Interview #1: October 20, 2012]

[Note: Mrs. Weaver’s daughter, Sharon Wilson, added the information that is italicized and in brackets after the interview took place.]
0:00-0:07

Tagg:

Hi, my name is Sarah Tagg and I am interviewing Maryanna Meade on October 20th, 2012 at one thirty PM.

 

0:08-0:09

Tagg:

What is your full name?

 

0:10-0:13

Meade:

Maryanna H. Meade

 

0:14-0:15

Tagg:

Where were you born?

 

0:16-0:19

Meade:

I’m, [?]

 

0:20-0:21

Tagg:

What year were you born?

 

0:22-0:23

Meade:

Nineteen-twenty.

 

0:24-0:25

Tagg:

What was it like living in nineteen-twenty?

 

0:26- 0:29

Tagg:

Where were you born again?

 

0:30- 0:33

Meade:

Nineteen-twenty, March the tenth, nineteen-twenty.

 

0:34-0:36

Tagg:

In what location, like what state were you born in?

 

0:37

Meade:

Colorado

 

0:38

Tagg:

Colorado?

 

0:39-0:44

Tagg:

Can you describe growing up in Colorado? Do you know, do you remember what town you lived in?

 

0:45-0:46

Meade:

Yeah, [Pueblo.]

0:47-0:49

Tagg:

Can you describe growing up in [Pueblo], you said?

 

0:50-0:52

Tagg:

Can you describe living in the town?

 

0:53-0:56

Tagg:
Can you describe growing up living in the town?

 

0:57-1:07

Meade:
Yeah, I went to school there. I went through High School but I lived in Canyon for most of the time. Canyon City.

 

1:07-1:08

Tagg:
Canyon City?

 

1:09-1:10

Tagg:

What was that like?

 

1:11-1:15

Meade:

It’s where the gorge is at. The [Royal Gorge].

 

1:14-1:16

[Pause]

 

1:17-1:18

Tagg:

Can you describe more about it?

 

1:19-2:07

Meade:

Well, I was born in nineteen-twenty. We lived on 1107 West Fifteenth Street. And I went to high school there. No, I was born in the country, I’m sorry. And then I went to junior high in [Pueblo] Colorado, high school, and then I went to nurses training and I worked up at Ca City in the hospitals after that.

 

2:08- 2:09

Tagg:

How long did you work there for?

 

2:10-2:11

[Pause]

 

2:12-2: 37

Meade:

Oh, I worked off and on. [Laughs] I worked, I got married, and then when he was in the service and when he was gone I would go back to work again. When I couldn’t go with him. So I lived in [Cañon] City after high school.

 

2:38-2:43

Tagg:

Going back to where you grew up, Do you, could you describe where your parents were from?

 

2:44-2:45

[Pause]

 

2:46-2:49

Tagg:

Going back to where you grew up, could you describe where your parents were from?

 

2:50-3:00

Meade:

They were from; my father was from New York [,] [Herkimer] New York. My mother was from [Pueblo].

 

3:01-3:02

Tagg:

Where’s that? What state was that again?

 

3:03-3:04

Meade:

[Pueblo], Colorado.

 

3:04

Tagg:

[Pueblo], Colorado?

 

3:05

Meade:

Uh huh.

 

3:06-3:08

Tagg:

What were their professions?

 

3:09-2:51

Meade:

My dad was a cement man and he could build…Well, he worked on the ditch for a while, [municipial] ditch. He was super attendant of that. And then he went to work at the, for the city, putting in cobbles and gutters. That was done during the depression time of twenty-nine. And then he worked for the government in the Ordinance during the war.

 

2:52-4:01

Tagg:

What did he do, do you remember what he did then? Do you remember what he worked on during that time? Do you know any special projects he worked on?

 

4:02

Meade:

I can’t hear you

 

4:03-4:06

Tagg:

When he was working for the government, do you remember any projects he worked on?

 

4:07

Tagg:

Did he ever tell you?

 

4:08-4:09

Meade:

No.

 

4:10

[Pause]

 

4:11-4:12

Tagg:

What did your mom do?

 

4:13-4:19

Meade:

She’s a housekeeper, mother, you name it. [Laughs]

 

4:20-4:23

Tagg:

Did she do any hobbies outside of working at the house?

 

4:24-4:25

Meade:

No, she mostly stayed home.

 

4:26-4:27

[Pause]

 

4:28-4:30

Tagg:

Did you have a great, good relationship with your parents?

 

4:31-4:33

Tagg:

Did you have a good relationship with your parents?

 

4:34

Meade:

Yes.

 

4:35-4:36

Tagg:

Do you have any siblings?

 

4:37-4:41.

Meade:

Yes, I have two brothers. They both passed away now.

 

4:42

Tagg:

Awe.

 

4:43-4:48

Meade:

They were officers in the, service to World War Two.

 

4:49

[Pause]

 

4:50-4:52

Tagg:

Where did they go? Did they go off to the war or did they stay here?

 

4:53- 5:04

Meade:

Well, they was in the war but they was discharged afterwards.

 

5:05

[Pause]

 

5:06-5:27

Meade:

My brothers, well my youngest brother spent twenty-one years in the service and he was a back pilot. He would transport, he worked on transport. But my other brother worked for the state highway building highways.

 

5:28-

Tagg:

Did…

 

5:29-5:32

Meade:

The both got out of the service as soon as they could.

 

5:33-5:35

Tagg:

Was there any reason for that? Do you know if they just wanted to serve their country?

 

5:36-5:36

[Pause]

 

5:37-5:38

Tagg:

Did they go to school before that?

 

5:39-5:42

Tagg:

In the service did they take any schooling?

 

5:43-6:06

Meade:

They was in the service and my brother was a pilot, he got his pilot training there and he left for World War Two. And he flew B-17’s transports. And he was flying over England…over Germany, and then he was shot down.

 

6:07

Tagg:

Awe.

 

6:08-6:12

Meade:

And he was a prisoner of war for three years or two year I don’t know.

 

6:13-6:15

Tagg:

Where was he a prisoner, what country was it? Germany?

 

6:16-6:17:

Tagg:

What country was he a prisoner of war from?

 

6:18-6:22

Meade:

Germany. He was a prisoner of war of Germany in World War Two.

 

6:23-6:25

Tagg:

Where in Germany, do you know? Where in Germany?

 

6:26-6:34

Meade:

There’s a prison camp, they made a movie out of it but I can’t tell ya.

 

[Stalag Lusfti, South Compound at Barth.]

 

6:35-6:36

Tagg:

Did he tell you any stories from when he came back?

 

6:37-6:40

Tagg:

When he came back to the states did he tell you any stories about it?

 

6:41-6:50

Meade:

When he come back to the states he had to rest period and then he went back again into the flying for the government again.

 

6:51

[Pause]

 

6:52

Meade:

For the service.

 

6:53

Tagg:

Wow.

 

6:54-7:03

Meade:

He was a major I think. Oh no he was a captain, yes.

 

7:04-

Tagg:

And is this your younger brother?

 

7:06-7:17

Meade:

This is the youngest brother, my oldest brother worked for the state highway. He was a supervisor to the state highway.

 

7:18-7:19

Tagg:

Was it in the United States?

 

7:20-

Meade:

No, in Colorado.

 

7:21

Tagg:

Oh, in Colorado.

 

7:22- 7:24

Meade:

They lived in Colorado.

 

7:25-7:29

Tagg:

Did he stay in Colorado the entire time of his service?

 

7:30-7:55

Meade:

Well, [he went all over], my brother was all over. He was flying to [?] after the war. [?] space in New Jersey. He was flying over seas. My other brother stayed in Colorado.

 

7:56

Tagg:

The whole time?

 

7:57

Meade:

Uh huh. (Nods head)

 

7:58-8:05

Tagg:

May you please tell me about your extended family? Any aunts or uncles? Did you live near family…?

 

8:05

Meade:

Oh geeze.

 

8:06

Tagg:

Back then?

 

8:07-8:14

Meade:

It a big family. [Laughs] They scattered all over the United States.

 

8:15-8:20

Tagg:

Did you ever travel to visit them? Or did they visit, or did you have any family customs you remember?

 

8:21-2:34

Meade:

Did I ever travel with my family? Well, we never had that much money to really travel with. [laughs] We pretty much stayed at home.

 

8:35-8:36

Tagg:

You said you lived in the country is that correct?

 

8:37-8:50

Meade:

Well, when my husband was in service he took me to Japan. I lived in Japan three years.

 

8:51

Tagg:

Yay.

 

8:51

Meade:

Uh huh.

 

8:52-8:53

Tagg:

What did you do in Japan may I ask?

 

8:54-8:55

Meade:

He was in the service.

 

8:56-

Tagg:

And did you work at all?

 

8:57-9:01

Meade:

[Masawa] is up in northern Japan.

 

9:02-9:02

Tagg:

Oh, could you repeat the name?

 

9:03-9:07

Tagg:

Could you repeat the name in the area of Japan?

 

9:08

[Pause]

 

9:09-9:13

Meade:

[Masawa], he was in and it’s an airbase in northern Japan.

 

9:14-9:16

Tagg:

And did you live on the base as well?

 

9:17-9:26

Meade:

Yeah, I mean we had a trailer house. We bought a trailer house and that’s what we lived in over there for three years.

 

9:27-9:30

Tagg:

When you were there, did you work when you were there; as a nurse?

 

9:31

Meade:

What?

 

9:32-9:35

Tagg:

When you were there living in Japan, did you work anywhere?

 

9:36:9:47

Meade:

Nuh uh. [Shakes head no] No I had [mammasan] she did my work, my housework even, I was a lady of leisure.

 

9:48-9:50

Tagg:

While you where there did you do anything for fun? Did you go anywhere?

 

9:51-9:54

Tagg:

While you were living there did you, did you travel anywhere or did you mostly stay

 

9:55-10:23

Meade:

No. We just went to Japan. We lived there for three years and then we come back. And then, but in the states we lived oh, let see. We lived in San Francisco, we lived in Seattle, we lived in Denver. Most of the time was spent in Biloxi, Mississippi.

 

10:24-10:26

Tagg:

In Mississippi, where did you, what did you do there?

 

10:27-10:43

Meade:

He was is an instructor down there in the school. See Biloxi was a place for schools. Military schools.

 

10:44-10:45

Tagg:

What school did he teach? Or did he go to?

 

10:46

[Pause]

 

10:47-10:49

Meade:

Biloxi, Mississippi.

 

10:50

[Pause]

 

10:51

Meade:

Uh huh.

 

10:52-10:54

[Pause]

 

10:55-11:00

Tagg:

Going back to where you were born, where you used to live when you were younger, what did your neighborhood look like?

 

11:01-11:05

Meade:

Just an ordinary neighborhood that’s all. [Laughs]

 

11:06-11:08

Tagg:

Where there a lot of people, or was it small?

 

11:09-11:14

Meade:

Oh, it was, it was a big town. It was a big town. Mhm.

 

11:15-11:18

Tagg:

Do you remember what your street looked like where you lived?

 

11:19-11:20

[Pause]

 

11:21

Meade:

Yeah.

 

11:22-11:23

Tagg:

Do you remember what the street looked like?

 

11:24-11:27

Meade:

Oh, it was just a regular street, a bunch of houses.

 

11:28-11:30

[Pause]

 

11:31-11:32

Tagg:

Let’s see, do you remember the street name?

 

11:33-

Meade:

Huh?

 

11:34-

Tagg:

What was the street name?

 

11:34-11:36

[Pause]

 

11:37

Tagg:

What was the street name?

 

11:38-11:44

Meade:

1107… 1107 West Fifteenth Street in [Pueblo], Colorado.

 

11:45-11:47

Tagg:

What were the people like in your area?

 

11:48

[Pause]

 

11:49-11:53

Meade:

Well, there were just houses that’s all.

 

11:54-12:02

Meade:

Mhm. Nice houses I mean it wasn’t the slums. No, I wasn’t raised in the slums. [Laughs]

 

12:03-12:06

Tagg:

Were they all, you said it was a large area?

 

12:07

Meade:

Huh?

 

12:08

Tagg:

You said it was a large area?

 

12:09

[Pause]

 

12:10

Tagg:

The town was large?

 

12:11

Meade:

I couldn’t hear you.

 

12:12-12:17

Tagg:

Is, was the town large, you said? Was the town, the population large?

 

12:18-12:45

Meade:

Oh, it was a big town. Uh huh. [Nods head yes] But when I went to [Cañon] it was a smaller town. There was a big penitentiary there. Penitentiary. And most of those people who lived there worked in the pen what we called penitentiary. Besides, you know, the other jobs just ordinary jobs.

 

12:46-12:50

Tagg:

What did they do at the penitentiary? Like what sort of jobs?

 

12:51-13:01

Meade:

No, my husband worked there the time he got out of the service for the first time. He went to work as a guard there. I worked in the hospital.

 

13:02-13:05

Tagg:

Do you have any stories from the hospital, any experiences you went through?

 

13:06-13:09

Tagg:

Did you, do you remember any events or stories about the hospital?

 

13:10-13:20

Meade:

Oh, I worked there for a long time. I worked for the nuns. For in their hospital for a long time.

 

13:21-13:26

Tagg:

Do you recall any stories, did soldiers come or was it for anyone?

 

13:37

Meade:

Hmm?

 

13:28-13:30

Tagg:

For the hospital, was it only for soldiers or was it for everyone?

 

13:31

[Pause]

 

13:32-13:38

Meade:

It was for everything mixed up, it took everything, it was a country town.

 

13:39-13:32

[Pause]

 

13:43- 12:48

Tagg:

Going back to your area were there a lot of people from different ethnicities or religion?

 

13:49-13:56

Meade:

Well, you had your Catholic, Protestant churches and Catholic churches.

 

13:57-13:59

Tagg:

Did you see any social divide in the living quarters?

 

14:00-

Meade:

Huh?

 

14:01-14:03

Tagg:

Did you see any social divide in the living quarters?

 

14:04

[Pause]

 

14:05-14:10

Tagg:

Did you…where there…were most of the people the same like origin?

 

14:11-14:12

Meade:

Oh, yeah! It was a country town.

 

14:13-14:14

[Pause]

 

14:16-14:19

Tagg:

Were there any local markets or town meeting locations where people went?

 

14:19-14:21

Meade:

Local market? Yeah, there’s one in town.

 

14:22-14:23

Tagg:

What were they like?

 

14:24-14:25

Meade:

They just were the stores.

 

14:26

Tagg:

Do you remember the names?

 

14:27

[Pause]

 

14:28-14:33

Meade:

Mmm I don’t remember the names now. Most of them was privately owned.

 

14:34-14:36

Tagg:

What could you buy at the stores?

 

14:37-14:41

Meade:

Everythin.’ Groceries, everything. Clothes.

 

14:42-14:44

Tagg:

Were they all together or were they on separate streets?

14:45-15:00

Meade:

No. They were…they were in the city. They had em on main street and everywhere. But mostly everybody went to the bigger cities to buy like clothes and stuff.

 

15:01-15:02

[Pause]

 

15:03-15:07

Tagg:

When you were a child did you attend Elementary school?

 

15:08

Meade:

Huh?

 

15:09-15:11

Tagg:

When you were a child did you attend Elementary school?

 

15:12-15:25

Meade:

Oh, I did and in the country, a one-room stone school. There was eight grades in one school.

 

15:26

Tagg:

You said eight grades?

 

15:27

Meade:

Uh huh.

 

15:28

Tagg:

How was that?

 

15:29

[Pause]

 

15:30-15:37

Meade:

There was in the [?] Colorado. A country town.

 

15:38-15:39

Tagg:

How many teachers did the school have?

 

15:40

Meade:

Huh?

 

15:40-15:41

Tagg:

How many teachers did the school have?

 

15:42-15:50

Meade:

Oh, I don’t remember but it was a one-room schoolhouse. They had eight grades.

 

15:51-

Tagg:

Were all the grades together in one room or where they separate?

 

15:54-15:55

Meade:

Yeah, one room!

 

15:56-15:57

Tagg:

Wow.

 

15:58-16:02

Tagg:

How many students do you believe were there?

 

16:03

Tagg:

Was it crowded?

 

16:05- 16:23

Meade:

Well it was just a neighborhood kids went to school there. I don’t know, no it wasn’t exactly crowded but it was full. And we had one teacher that taught all eight grades.

 

16:24-16:25

Tagg:

Do you remember her name, or was it a he or she?

 

16:26-16:28

Meade:

I don’t remember, no.

 

16:29

[Pause]

 

16:30-16:34

Tagg:

Did you have to share any supplies or did each person have their own books?

 

16:35-16:42

Meade:

No, they furnished the books and stuff. There was a country school.

 

16:43-16:44

Tagg:

Do you remember the name… of the school?

 

16:45

Meade:

No.

 

16:46-16:49

[Pause]

 

16:50-16:51

Meade:

It was a stone brook Catholic school one room.

 

16:52-16:57

Tagg:

Did you attend, so would that include Middle School or was there a separate school for Middle School?

 

16:58-17:10

Meade:

Yeah, I went to school there and then I went… we moved to Eastern town and I went to a bigger school there. They had their own separate classrooms then.

 

17:11-17:13

[Pause]

 

17:14

Meade:

It was just a country city.

 

17:15-17:17

Tagg:

Was that for high school when you went there?

 

17:18

Meade:

Huh?

 

17:19

Tagg:

Was that for high school?

 

17:20-17:24

Meade:

For high school…I went to high school in [Pueblo].

 

17:25

[Pause]

 

17:26-

Meade:

I graduated there from that big high school.

 

17:32-17:34

Tagg:

What year did you graduate from high school?

 

17:35-

 

17:38-17:42

Meade:

1928 I think…1930 I don’t know. I can’t remember that.

 

17:43-17:44

Tagg:

Do you remember the name of the high school?

17:45

Meade:

Huh?

 

17:46-17:47

Tagg:

Do you remember the name of the high school?

 

17:48-17:49

Meade:

Central High School.

 

17:50-17:51

[Pause]

 

17:52-17:53

Tagg:

Did you have any favorite subjects in school?

 

17:54

Meade:

Huh?

 

17:55-17:57

Tagg:

Did you have any favorite subjects in school?

 

17:58-17:59

Meade:

Favorite what?

 

18:00-18:02

Tagg:

Subjects like math or science.

 

18:03-18:17

Meade:

No, see it was a school where you taken what you wanted to take, really. You had your history, and it was just regular school.

 

18:18-18:20

Tagg:

What classes did you take? Do you remember?

 

18:21-18:34

Meade:

Well I took everything. You took your English, and your math and your… and know you wandered in high school to prepare for going on through life.

 

18:35

[Pause]

 

18:36-18:38

Tagg:

Did you go to college?

 

18:39-18:41

Meade:

I went to nurses training.

18:42-18:44

Tagg:

Where did you go for nursing training?

 

18:45-18:47

Meade:

I went in [Pueblo].

 

18:48-18:49

Tagg:

Where’s that located?

 

18:50-18:51

Meade:

[Pueblo], that’s where I lived.

 

18:52-18:53

Tagg:

And that’s in Colorado.

 

18:54-19:18

Meade:

Uh huh. From there… then I went up and started workin’ up at the hospitals in [Cañon]. And then I met my husband and then we went and got married. We trucked around until they called him in service. So, we trucked around the country for a while.

 

19:19-19:20

[Pause]

 

19:21-19:22

Meade:

I kept suitcases packed. [Chuckles]

 

19:22

Tagg:

Oh, you did!

 

19:23-19:28

Tagg:

How many suitcases did you keep packed? Did you always have one packed and ready?

 

19:29

Meade:

Huh?

 

19:30-19:32

Tagg:

Did you always have suitcase packed and ready?

 

19:33-19:34

[Pause]

 

19:35-19:37

Tagg:

Did you always have a suitcase ready and packed?

 

19:38

Meade:

Huh?

 

19:39-19:43

Tagg:

For when you traveled… Did you always…you said you had a suitcase packed.

 

 

19:44-19:51

Meade:

Oh, we always took our luggage. You know everyday luggage just a…

 

19:52-19:55

Tagg:

When you traveled, did you take a train? Or did you use a car?

 

19:56-20:18

Meade:

Oh, no we drove because we got mileage, you see. But we spent a lot of time in Biloxi, Mississippi. That’s where we spent most of our time. He was an instructor there.

 

20:19

Tagg:

At the…

 

20:20-

Meade:

Biloxi, Mississippi.

 

20:21

Tagg:

The school… [Cuts off]

 

20:22-20:15

Meade:

It was an air base.

 

20:26-20:30

Tagg:

When you were there, did you say you also worked at a hospital?

 

20:31

Meade:

No, I didn’t work then.

 

20:32

Tagg:

Okay.

 

20:33-20:35

Meade:

[Laughs] I was lazy.

 

 

20:36-20:37

[Laughs]

 

20:38-20:41

[Pause]

 

20:42-20:44

Tagg:

Let’s see. Looking back at your immediate family, when you were living in Colorado, how… you said your … you didn’t travel a lot due to the Depression.

 

20:55-20:56

Meade:

No, we’ze too poor.

 

20:57

Meade:

We had to eat!

 

20:59

Tagg:

Awe.

 

21:00-21:03

Tagg:

Could you describe what it was like living in the Great Depression?

 

21:04

[Pause]

 

21:05-21:19

Meade:

In [Pueblo]? It was just a town. That’s all. I went to school there and then I left when I finished high school.

 

21:20- 21:21

Meade:

So, that’s my roommate. [Roommate walks into room]

 

21:22

Tagg:

Hi. [Acknowledges roommate]

 

21:23-21:25

[Pause]

 

21:26-21: 56

Meade:

So, I left school and I went training and in [Pueblo] and then after that I went to Canyon and went to work for the nuns. I didn’t go to the nuns right away, I went to a private hospital. Then I went to Long beach, then we went to California and when I come back we went over seas so I went to work back for the nuns again.

 

21:57-

Tagg:

When you went to California, did you…

 

22:01-22:05

Meade:

Long beach, California. I worked in the Aircraft Factory down there.

 

22:06-

Tagg:

Oh, what did you do there?

 

22:07-22:10

Meade:

Long beach, California.

 

22:11-22:14

Tagg:

When you worked for the aircraft factory, what did you do?

 

22:15- 22:56

Meade:

Well, I riveted. [Laughs] Just call me Rosie the Riveter. And then they had me…I put the tail pieces together on the C-47 transports. That was just before the war. And then I worked on the A-26 Fighter plane. Fighter planes.  I climbed up on the top and tested the gas tanks just before they went to the army. [army]

 

22:57

[Pause]

 

22:58-22:59

Tagg:

How long did you work there?

 

23:00-23:23

Meade:

I worked there, I mean at the Douglas Aircraft… and I think I almost worked there two years or something. I don’t know. Cuz’ the military didn’t make much money so we had to go to work to pay for the household expenses.

 

23:24

Tagg:

How was the pay?

 

23:25-23:27

[Pause]

 

23:28-23:31

Meade:

In the military? About twenty-one dollars about. [Laughs]

 

23:32-23:35

Tagg:

Did you enjoy working at the Aircraft factory?

 

23:36-23:43

Meade:

I liked California very much. And I liked Biloxi very much.

 

23:44

Tagg:

When you were in California..

 

23:45-23:52

Meade:

Biloxi was more work. We worked; we stayed there three years at a time.

 

22:53

Tagg:

And that would be…

 

22:54-24:19

Meade:

And then he goes some place and then he well that’s when we went to Japan. Because Japan and then he come back, we come back, went back to Biloxi again when he was an instructor. And then, then, what was the next tour?

 

24:20-24:21

[Pause]

 

24:22

Meade:

We lived in Biloxi.

 

 

24:25

[Pause]

 

24:27-24:36

Meade:

And oh, we come back one time and lived in San Francisco. One time we lived in Seattle.

 

24:37-24:39

Tagg:

What did you do in Seattle, when you lived there?

 

24:40

Meade:

He uh..

 

24:41-24:25

[Pause]

 

24:46- 24:51

Meade:

He was an air traffic controller. That’s what he was.

 

24:52-24:53

Tagg:

Did you live there also?

 

24:53

Meade:

Huh?

 

24:54-24:55

Tagg:

Did you also live there?

 

24:56- 25:01

Tagg:

In, when he was in Seattle working, did you also move to Seattle?

 

25:02-25:12

Meade:

Oh, yeah. And then we lived in Long beach before he left for his first tour. And that’s…

 

25:13

Tagg:

How long did he…

 

25:14-25:50

Meade:

And let’s go back here. In Long Beach was where he got his first assignment. That’s when I went to work at Douglas working on the aircrafts. Oh we all went, all the wives worked at Douglas making the living, [Laughs] if you know what that is. [Laughs] And then he left for overseas again so I stayed in Colorado and went back home to Colorado and stayed until he come back.

 

25:51-25:56

Tagg:

When you moved back to Colorado, did you move back to your old home area or did you move somewhere else?

 

25:56

Meade:

Yeah.

 

25:57-26:00

Meade:

Well, I went to back [Cañon] to work for the nuns.

 

26:01- 26:03

Tagg:

How was working you said for the nuns?

 

26:04

Meade:

Uh huh.

 

26:05

Tagg:

Did you enjoy that?

 

26:06-26:07

Meade:

The Catholic hospital.

 

26:08-26:26

Meade:

Uh huh. So, and then we come back, we went to it seems like we went to… back to Biloxi again. Where he is a instructor.

 

 

 

26:27- 26:31

Tagg:

So talking about your husband. What was his name?

 

26:32- 26:35

Meade:

Charles. R. Meade.

 

26:36- 26:37

Tagg:

And where did you meet your husband?

 

26:38

Meade:

Huh?

 

26:39-26:40

Tagg:

Where did you meet him?

 

26:41-26:58

Meade:

He lived in the [Cañon] City in the town where I worked. He worked on top of the mines [South London Gold mine] and I met on top of a mountain. The highest mountains in Colorado.

 

26:58

Tagg:

Wow.

 

26:59-28:02

Meade:

So, he would come down and see me and stuff. Then he would come to the hospital and sit, I’ll be workin.’ Then we’ll go out and would go get something to eat or something that was the life we led then. And, well then he… see where’d he go to Biloxi. He took us to Japan one time. And, but we spent a lot of time in Biloxi, Mississippi.  He was a instructor. One time he had a tour, a nine months tour in Denver, which is just ninety miles from home. So we lived, we enjoyed that. That was close to our home.

 

28:03-28:06

Tagg:

Where was your husband born?

 

28:07-28:15

Meade:

What, oh he was born in a country town in eastern Colorado.

 

28:16-28:19

Tagg:

Did you know of his family’s background? Where they were from?

 

28:20-28:24

Tagg:

Did you know where is family is, where they were from?

 

28:25- 28:59

Meade:

They were from, they lived on what they called drag land in the eastern Colorado before he went to work up. Well, then they moved to [Cañon], City and then they…let’s see, well then he; he worked up at the mines, Climax mine, when I married him.

 

29:00-29:02

Tagg:

How old were you when you got married?

 

29:03-29:05

Meade:

I was twenty-two I think.

 

29:06-29:08

Tagg:

Where did you get married?

 

29:09- 29:10

Meade:

[Ratón] New Mexico. We eloped!

 

29:11-29:14

Tagg:

New Mexico? You eloped? Did you, what did you…[Interrupted]

 

29:15-29:30

Meade:

Because he was called into service, you see.  He says if we don’t get married we won’t be able to get married so, I’m leaving for the service. So I was determined not to let him leave without. [Laughs]

 

29:31

Tagg:

Awe.

 

29:32

Meade:

Before he died. [Laughs]

 

29:33-29:36

Tagg:

What was your wedding like?

 

29:36

Meade:

Huh?

 

29:37-29:38

Tagg:

What was your wedding like?

 

29:39-29:40

Meade:

Oh, I, we eloped!

 

29:41-29:42

Tagg:
Oh, so did you just…

 

29:43-29:45

Meade:

We just went and got married!

 

29:46

Tagg:

At the courthouse?

 

29:47-29:48

Meade:

At the state. [Chuckles]

 

29:49-29:52

Tagg:

Did you wear a dress? Do you remember what you were wearing?

 

29:52- 29:54

Meade:

Just a regular dress. [Chuckles]

29:55

[Pause]

 

29:56-30:02

Meade:

I didn’t dress up, and he didn’t dress up. We didn’t have time because he was leaving!

30:03- 30:05

Tagg:

Did you have any children?

 

30:06-30:07

Meade:

I have two

 

30:08-30:11

Tagg:

What are their names?

 

30:12-32:16

Meade:

Well, I had a daughter; she is now a nurse at Mary Washington up on two [North]. She, well, then I have a son. He’s over in Taiwan. He’s a missionary over in Taiwan. If I go into that you’d be surprised because they both went to ODU, no, in Norfolk, Virginia. They graduated from from college. They are both teachers. They taught one semester. Oh, for one year I guess they taught. They came home, they didn’t want to teach. My son says, his kids was too mean. He was an industrial arts teacher. He says, “I got all that machinery and the kids would whine.” So, he so he came home. While he worked at the shipyards for a while. Till he uh, Norfolk, Virginia. And uh, when Sharon moved out, and moved down here, she went back to the junior college and got her associates degree in nursing. An she got a job there, too. When she moved out, he moved in. He says I want to go to the uh, Seminary. I says, I can’t afford to send you there. He says, “I’ll do it myself.” So he, he worked at Giant in the afternoons and went to the school in the mornin’. And then graduated from the religion seminary.

 

32:17

Tagg:

Where was that?

 

32:18-32:29

Meade:

In um, I know it I can tell ya. Northeast eh, northeast, Washington, D.C.

 

32:30

Tagg:

Oh, really?

32:31

Meade:

Uh huh.

 

32:32-32:34
Tagg:

Let’s see.

 

32:35-32:38

Meade:

He graduated from, with a Masters in Theology.

 

32:39-32:40

Tagg:

In theology, you said?

32:41-32:51

Meade:

And met his wife there and she went all over and then when he finished school she came back and they got married. He, she’s a missionary, too you see.

32:52-32:53

Tagg:

And you said he went to Taiwan, you said?

32:54
Meade:

Uh huh.

32:55-32:56

Tagg:

Is she there also, with him?

32:57

Meade:

Huh?

32:58-32:59

Tagg:

Is his wife, um, in Taiwan.

33:00

Meade:

Oh, yeah they live.
33:01

Tagg:

Wow!

33:02-33:03

Meade:

[Laughs]
33:04- 33:17

Meade:

They lived in Hong Kong or about 11 or 12 years. So they are missionaries over there. And then they got sent to Taiwan. And that’s where he’s at now.

33:18-33:21

Tagg:
Did you ever travel there to visit them?

33:22-33:24

Meade:

No, nuh uh. Not with my son.

33:25-33:33

Tagg:

Going back to your past, and World War II. What are your first memories of World War II?

33:34

Meade:

Huh?

33:35-33:38

Tagg:

Going back to World War II…what were your first memories of the war?

33:39-33:45

Meade:

I sure went back to work. Haha. [Laughs]

33:46-33:49

Meade:

He was gone.

33:50-33:52

Tagg:

How do you remember first hearing about the war?
33:53-33:54

Meade:

About the war?

33:55

Tagg:

Mhm.

33:56-34:14

Meade:

Well, I had the idea of keeping them off of our shores. Let them destroy their land. Don’t let them on this country. [That’s] this country.

34:15-34:20

Tagg:

Did you hear about the war from other people or did you read them in magazines, or hear on the radio?

34:21- 34:40

Meade:

Well, my brother was a prisoner of war for two, three years. He was a pilot of the transports and uh, he was shot down over the River Rhine. So he lived in, prison camp for almost three years.

34:41-34:43

Tagg:

Did you say the River Rhine?

34:44

Meade:

Uh huh.

34:45-34:36

Tagg:

That’s in Germany?

34:37-34:56

Meade:

He did there. There’s a movie made about that raid where they were shot down from a plane in the squadron.
34:57-34:58

[Pause]
34:59-35:04

Meade:

The German’s did and took them all prisoners.

35:05-35:06

Tagg:

Did he tell you any stories?

35:07

Meade:

Huh?

35:08-35:09

Tagg:

Did he tell you any stories about being a prisoner?

35:10- 35:31

Meade:

Oh, they didn’t have anything to eat; they ate toast and stuff from out of the garbage can. [laughs] It was a pretty rough living. Then the Germans, let’s see… the German’s went in and freed them one day. That’s when he come back home and [trails off]

34:32

Tagg:

Do you know why they were freed?

35:33

Meade:

Huh?

35:34-35:36

Tagg:

Do you know why he was freed?

35:37-35:38

[Pause]

35:39-35:55

Meade:

Why what, oh, yeah he come back to the states. They, they all did and was freed from the prison camp. And they come back on the Green Mary and they sat on the deck, and they come back on the Green Mary.

35:56-35:58
Tagg:

Do you remember what the name of the prison camp was?

35:09-36:00

[Pause]

36:01-36:08

Meade:

Oh, dear can’t right off, but it was one that they made a movie of.

 

36:09-36:10

[Pause]
36:11

Meade:

The Germans

 

36:12-36:13

[Pause]

36:15

Tagg:

How old were you… [Stopped]

36:15-36:16

Meade:

It was the Russians that went in and freed them! That’s who it was.

36:17-36:18

Tagg:

Oh, so the Russians freed them?

36:19

Meade:

[Nods in agreement] Uh huh.
36:20-36:23

Tagg:

Do you know if they took over the camp when they freed them?

36:23

Meade:

Huh?

36:24- 36:28

Tagg:

Do you know if the Russian’s freed them, like you said they were freed by the Russians.

36:29-36:32
Meade:

I think the Russian’s did.

36:33

Tagg:

Do you know if the Russians came… [Started talking and was cut off]

36:34-36:39
Meade:

I don’t know that has been a long time ago.

 

36:40-36:43

Tagg:

How old were you when World War Two began?

 

36:44

Meade:

Huh?

 

36:45- 35:46

Tagg:

How old were you when World War Two began?

 

35:47-35:50

Meade:

How old was I? When, what, how old?

 

35:51

Tagg:
When the war began.

 

36:52

Meade:

Huh?

 

36:53-36:55
Tagg:

How old were you when World War Two began?

 

36:56-36:58

Meade:
How old was I when, what?

 

36:59-37:00

Tagg:

When the war began.

 

37:01

Meade:

Huh?

 

37:02-37:04

Tagg:

How old were you when the war began.

 

37:05- 37:12

Meade:

Oh, I was twenty-one I think.

 

37:13- 37:13

Tagg:

You got married when you were twenty-two?

 

37:14-

Meade:

Huh?

 

37:15-37:16

Tagg:

And you were married when you were twenty-two?

 

37:17-37:36

Meade:

Yeah, when they declared the war we got married. Well he already had his orders to go overseas. Or going to basic and then he left and I didn’t know where he was for a while but he was over in China.

 

37:37-37:38

Tagg:

Did he ever write you any letters?

 

37:38

Meade:

Huh?

 

37:39

Tagg:

Did he write you any letters?

 

37:40-37:42

Meade:

They couldn’t let you know where they were.

 

37:42

Tagg:

Oh.

 

37:43-37:44

[Pause]

 

37:45- 37:51

Tagg:

How did, oh, did you have to pay close attention to food or rationing during the war?

 

37:52-37:58

Meade:

No. It was a serious time.

 

37:59-38:01

Tagg:

How did your family react to the war?

 

38:02

[Pause]

 

39:03- 38:09

Meade:

Well, my two brothers did what they could to react.

 

38:10-38:14

Tagg:

Mhm. Let’s see.

 

38:15-38:27

Meade:

And my husband was in the war though but they were the family. From my husband’s family they had five brothers in the service.

 

38:28

Tagg:

Five!

 

38:29

Meade:

Uh huh. Yeah, my mother-in-law had five.

 

38:30-38:34

Tagg:

And all of them went into the service you said?

 

38:35-38:58

Meade:

One was a gunner out in Italy, I think and he got shot so he got discharged. His tail gun. And the other ones in Italy and the other one is, oh I don’t remember now where they were.

 

38:59- 39:03

Tagg:

What did you know about the internment camps for the Japanese Americans?

 

39:04

Meade:

Huh?

 

39:05-39:10

Tagg:

Did you know about the internment of the Japanese Americans?

 

39:11-39:13

[Pause]

 

39:14

Tagg:

Of the encampment of them?

 

39:15-39:20

Meade:

The encampment… but the Japanese prison…it was a German prison.

 

39:21-39:35

Tagg:

When the Japanese immigrants came to the U.S. during that time, many were taken into an encampment. Did you know about that time?

 

39:36-39:50

Meade:

But, they didn’t come over here. The purpose was to keep them on their own land. That’s why they all went over seas. They didn’t get over here.

 

39:51-39:53

Tagg:

What events do you remember from World War Two?

 

39:54

Meade:

Huh?

 

39:55-39:45

Tagg:

What events do you remember from World War Two?

 

39:57-39:59

[Pause]

 

40:00- 40:07

Meade:

They come over here. I don’t know. I’d hate to say.

 

40:08- 40:11

Tagg:

Do you remember D-Day?

 

40:11

Meade:

Huh?

 

40:12

Tagg:

Do you remember D-Day?

 

40:13

Tagg:

Or Pearl Harbor?

 

40:14

[Pause]

 

40:25- 40:31

Meade:

Pearl Harbor? I knew a pilot who flew one of the first airplanes over the heart of Pearl Harbor. And then he, and then they were all taken as German prisoners.

 

40:32-40:34

Tagg:

Who was your friend?

 

40:35-40:36

[Pause]

 

40:37-40:39

Meade:

I prefer not to say his name.

 

40:40

Tagg:

Sure.

 

40:41-40:46

Meade:

He was the first, one of the first pilots in the air force.

 

40:47

Tagg:

That’s pretty amazing.

 

40:48-40:49

[Pause]

 

40:50-40:51

Tagg:

Did they ever tell you any stories about that?

 

40:52

[Pause]

 

40:53-40:56

Meade:

No, just what you saw in the movies.

 

40:57-40:58

Tagg:

And you said that they took German prisoners?

 

40:59-41:28

Meade:

Yeah, they, in the Japanese over the Germans. The Germans took, when the planes kept left England they shot them down over the River Rhine. That’s where my brother was. Took every one of them prisoners. They were prisoners for two years I think.

 

41:29-41:31

Tagg:

And then you said for the Japanese in Pearl Harbor.

 

41:31

Meade:

Huh?

 

41:32-41:35

Tagg:

For Pearl Harbor, in your…Pearl Harbor.

 

41:36-41:54

Meade:

Pearl Harbor that was when they declared war and they was stationed in Honolulu I believe. I can’t remember that. That was a long time ago.

 

41:55-42:03

Tagg:

Do you remember if the Second World War affected your town where you were born?

 

42:04

[Pause]

 

42:05-42:26

Meade:

Well, it didn’t effect the town too much, except people left, they drafted so many people to the war that they had kind of a rough time. Families had kind of a rough time.

 

42:27-42:28

Tagg:

Did more people have to work?

 

42:29

Meade:

Huh?

 

42:30-42:31

Tagg:

Did more people have to work during that time?

 

42:32

[Pause]

 

42:33-42:35

Tagg:

Did more people have to work during that time?

 

42:36-42:37

Meade:

I still can’t hear you.

 

42:38-42:41

Tagg:

Did more people have to work during that time?

 

42:42-42:45

Meade:

Oh, yeah. Women had to work.

 

43:46- 42:47

Tagg:

What jobs did women usually work?

 

42:48- 43:21

Meade:

Oh, everything and anything that they could find to do. Mostly in the stores and factories and whatever they could find and do because the military at that time didn’t get any money, much money. So the women worked a lot and they were gone over seas anyways so you couldn’t go to World War Two with them.

 

43:22- 42:25

Tagg:

So you said you were a nurse during that time, correct?

 

42:26

Meade:

Huh?

 

42:37-43:28

Tagg:

You said you worked as a nurse.

 

43:29

Meade:

Uh huh.

 

43:30-43:32

Tagg:

And how many hospitals did you work for?

 

43:33- 44:00

Meade:

Well, I worked in a private hospital, I worked at one that was privately owned, and then I worked for the nuns. They had their own hospital in town. And I would work and when my husband would come home from overseas I would go with him. And when we would go overseas again I would go back to the nuns and call me back to work again.

 

44:01-44:04

Tagg:

When you were a nurse what jobs did you do?

 

44:05- 44:17

Meade:

Everything. In your, that’s the olden countries. Older times. You do everything there’s no separations.

 

44:18-44:21

[Pause]

 

44:22-44:25

Tagg:

And you said you worked for the Douglas Aircraft Company? And that was in…

 

44:26-44:28

Meade:

Two I worked there, yeah.

 

44:29
Tagg:

And that was in California?

 

44:30

Meade:

Huh?
44:30

Tagg:

That was in California?

 

44:31-44:32

Tagg:

Uh huh. [Nods head in agreement]

 

44:34-45:12

Meade:

See, my husband was first stationed out in California, too when I could go with him. And we all, twenty-one dollars did not go very far… so all the wives went to work at Douglas Aircraft making a living. It was nothing. But anyway, I worked there until he went overseas again. I went back home.

 

45:13-45:17

Tagg:

When you worked at the aircraft factory did you have any uniforms? Did everyone just wear…

 

45:18-45:20

Meade:

No we just wore ordinary clothes.

 

45:21-45:22

Tagg:

Could you wear jeans? Did you wear…

 

45:23-45:28

Meade:

Yeah we wore jeans. We could wear anything.

 

45:29

[Pause]

 

45:30-45:56
Meade:

We all went to work there and were stationed in Long beach. See there are all different kinds of bases in Long Beach. These is just one base you know. There was a different bases out there.

 

45:57

Tagg:

What kind of bases were there?

 

45:58-46:08

Meade:

There was navy; there was marines and all kinds of services out there.

 

46:09-46:12

Tagg:

As a woman, how was your experience working with planes?

 

46:13

[Pause]

 

46:14

Meade:

Huh?

 

46:15-46:16

Tagg:

As a woman, how was your experience working with planes?

 

46:17-46:18

[Pause]

 

46:19-46:21

Tagg:

How was your experience working with planes? Was it…

 

46:22

Meade:

Oh, I

 

46: 24

Tagg:

Was it easy to understand?

 

46:24-46:51

Meade:

I liked it! Rosie the Riveter, it was fun! I climbed up on the tail of fighter, and put the tail together the C-47 transports. And then when they took me off of that I worked on the first fighter planes. And I had tested the gas tanks on it.

 

46:52

Tagg:

How did you test the gas tanks?

 

46:53-46:54

[Pause]

46:55- 47:01

Meade:

With air and it didn’t leak. It was all right.

 

47:02-47:05

Tagg:

Where there men there also, or was it mostly women working there?

 

47:06

Meade:

Huh?

 

47:07-47:08

Tagg:

Where there also men working at the same time or was it mostly women?

 

47:08- 47:12

Meade:

Oh, yeah. There were a lot of men working there.

 

47:13-47:16

Tagg:

Were you treated differently or were you treated about the same?

 

47:17

Meade:

Hmm?

 

47:18- 47:28
Tagg:

When you were working at the company were you treated the same as everyone else? When you were working with the planes. Were you treated the same as men there?

 

47:29-47:37

Meade:

Oh, yeah. If you worked riveted stuff you worked right along amongst men.

 

47:38-47:44

Tagg:

Prior to working with the Douglas aircraft company, did you have any experience working with planes or was that the first time?

 

47:45-48:02

Meade:

Well, no I didn’t, I just put the tailgate together and tested the gas tanks before they left for the army. Filled full with air. [Laughs]

48:03- 48:10

Tagg:

And then… After the, you worked there did you move back you said to Colorado?

 

48:11-48:23

Meade:

I moved back to Colorado while he went overseas and I went back home.

 

48:24-48:27

Tagg:

And what do you remember about the end of World War Two?

 

 

48:28-40:29

[Pause]

 

48:30-48:34

Meade:

Well, see let me think back….

 

48:34-48:37

[Pause]

 

48:38- 48:58

Meade:

Until he come home…was it…that would be when they declared peace with the Japanese. Because when they signed the treaty in, you know the peace treaty, where they it started bringing the troops home again.

 

48:59- 49:06

Tagg:

Was your husband already back by then when the war ended or did he come back after, they signed the treaty?

 

49:06-49:08

Meade:

No, I come back with him.

 

49:09

Tagg:

Oh yeah, do you…

 

49:10-50:13

Meade:

I mean that was after the war that he went to Japan. He took his discharge and there was peace was signed and went to work at the prison. Well and then they called him back into service again. And because he went to China I couldn’t go with him. Well, I didn’t even know where he was. But he went to China and then he come back in a year when peace was signed with the Japanese. He come back home and he got off for four years and then he was called back in the service on the reserves. So he stayed in after that.

 

50:14- 50:22

Tagg:

Where did you stay after he returned? Did you stay back in California, or I mean Colorado?

 

50:23- 50:39

Meade:

Oh, I went with him a lot when he’s stationed in the states. But the last time he was stationed in Alaska there was no accommodations for families. He was gone a year, he was isolated.

 

50:40- 50:42

Tagg:

During that time where were you living?

 

50:43-50:45

Meade:

Back in [Cañon]. [Laughs]

 

50:46- 50:48

Tagg:

Were you working as a nurse at that time still?

 

50:49

[Meade nods head in agreement]

 

50:49-50:50

Meade:

Back with the nuns again. [Laughs]

 

50:51

[Pause]

 

50:52-50:57

Tagg:

What year did you retire? Or when did you retire from being a nurse?

 

50:58-51:02

Meade:

Me? Oh, I don’t know I don’t remember.

51:03-51:09

Tagg:

Do you remember anything having to do with the holocaust in Germany?

 

51:10

Meade:

Huh?

 

51:11-51:12

[Pause]

 

51:13

Meade:

What did you say?

 

51:14- 51:20

Tagg:

When, back in Germany did you remember anything about the holocaust during that time?

 

51:21- 51:24

Meade:

I wasn’t in Germany I was in Japan.

 

51:25- 51:31

Tagg:

So going to you know present day… you say you have grandchildren?

 

51:31

Meade:

Me?

 

51:32

Tagg:

Mhm.

 

51:32- 51:45

Meade:

Today I have one daughter; she graduated from, one granddaughter she graduated from George Mason last year. Criminal Justice, she’s a policeman. [Laughs]

 

51:46

Tagg:

She’s a policeman?

 

 

51:47-52:03

Meade:

Uh huh. She’s in security. She’s in security.  She works for a company up at D.C.

 

52:04

Tagg:

How often… [Breaks off]

 

52:04

Meade:

Security.

 

52:05- 52:06

Tagg:

How often do you see her?

 

52:07-52:08

Meade:

Oh, she lives here.

 

52:09

Tagg:

Oh, in Fredericksburg?

 

52:10-52:51

Meade:

She lives here with my daughter. Yeah, see I lived in Arlington for a long time and then when I got sick the first time my family decided I should be moved over here because my daughter’s a nurse at Mary Washington. Up on two [North]. And she wanted me, she says, “I can’t drive 95, take care of you, and all the other stuff.” So they sold my house and she moved me in here and that’s how come I landed here. Here.

 

52:52- 52:58

Tagg:

What has been the most influential event in your life so far?

 

52:59- 53:10

Meade:

Oh I know, he… he was very easy to get along with and when we was home. [Laughs]

 

53:11

Tagg:

Awe.

 

53:12- 53:14

Meade:

He was gone a lot.

 

53:15- 53:18

Tagg:

How long did you live in Arlington?

 

53:19- 53:26

Meade:

I think we was there for about six years.

 

53:27-53:26

Tagg:

Where were you living before you were in Arlington?

 

53:27- 53:32

[Pause]

 

53:33- 53:34

Meade:

Let’s see where did we live. [Laughs]

 

53:35-53:37

[Pause]

 

53:38-54:00

Meade:

Oh, that’s when he was in the military and we moved all over. But when he got out of the military he got a job back here in security at the government. So we moved back here. That’s where we were when he passed away. He died of a heart attack.

 

54:02

Tagg:

And was that in Virginia?

 

54:03

Meade:

Huh?

 

54:54

Tagg:

Was that in Virginia?

 

54:55-54:19

Meade:

We lived in Arlington and he worked in security. He was a guard with the company. Then he was out of service then.

 

54:20

Tagg:

He was out of service?

 

54:22

Meade:

Uh huh. [Meade nods head in agreement] He was a civilian.

 

54:22-54:26

Tagg:

Where in Arlington, oh I was going to say… where in Arlington did you live?

 

54:27-54:28

[Pause]

 

54:29- 54:35

Meade:

Let’s see if I can describe it to you. You know where Arlington Cemetery is?

 

54:35

Tagg:

Mhm.

 

54:35- 54:40

Meade:

Just two miles from that on highway fifty.

 

54:41- 54:47

Tagg:

While you were there did you go to any entertainment? Did you go to DC? Washington D.C.

 

54:48

[Pause]

 

54:49

Meade:

Huh?

 

54:50-54:53

Tagg:

Will you were living in Arlington did you travel anywhere, did you go to D.C.?

 

54:54- 54:57

Meade:

Oh, we went back home to see the family every so often.

 

54:58-55:02

Tagg:

You said your daughter now lives here and [Breaks off]

 

55:02- 55:06

Meade:

She lives here. Yeah, she’s a nurse at Mary Washington.

 

55:07-55:10

Tagg:

And you said your son lives [Breaks off]

 

55:10- 55:15

Meade:

Is a missionary overseas. He and his wife are both missionaries overseas.

 

55:6-55:17

[Pause]

 

55:18- 55:24

Tagg:

Okay, and thank you for your time and contribution to the project. This is the end of the video.

 

55:25

Meade:

Okay.

 

[End of Interview]

 

 

 

css.php