Mary Oakey Interview

Mary Oakey Interview- Oral History from UMW History on Vimeo.

Mary Oakey was born in 1919 in Pennsylvania. Her difficulties during her childhood made her independent after she found a job. She remembers that time of her life as being the best time of her life. Although she recognized the sadness of the war, she chose for it not to affect her personal situation.

Mary Oakey Transcript

 

It is recommended that this oral history be cited as follows:

Rosie the Riveter and the World War II American Home Front Oral History Project: An Oral History with Mary Oakey conducted by Hannah Laughlin, 2012, Department of History and American Studies, University of Mary Washington, 2012.

 

Discursive Table of Contents- Mary Oakey

 

00:00:01

Born in 1919- family background- life in Summerset County, Pennsylvania- childhood and growing up

 

00:10:51

School- move to Turkey Foot Township- difficulty with no mother- graduating in Banther

 

00:19:13

Seeing family- Secretary in Harrisburg (Medical and Dental State Boards)- life in Harrisburg, marriage, move to Rome, New York- start of the war (heard over the radio)- enlistment

 

00:28:18

Community in Rome, New York- life in Rome- rationing- sadness of war- married life

 

00:39:36

Social Life (movies, operas)- life in Utica- North Carolina, visiting husband, working as a secretary

 

00:49:50

Hearing about the war- German camps- PTSD symptoms- reflection of the home front experience

 

 

Interview with Mary Oakey

Interview by Hannah Laughlin

Transcribed by Hannah Laughlin

 

 

00:00:01

Laughlin:

What is your full name and when and where were you born?

 

00:00:04

Oakey:

My full name is Mary Hostetler Oakey. And I was born in Confluence, Pennsylvania.

 

00:00:23

Laughlin:

What year were you born?

 

00:00:25

Oakey:

1919.

 

00:00:28

Laughlin:

Tell me about your childhood and what you remember.

 

00:00:35

Oakey:

Well, I remember losing my mother at the age of three. She passed away and we lived on a small farm in Summerset County, Pennsylvania. It was a part of my grandfather’s farm and he gave it to my mother. My father was not a farmer. He was- he worked for the railroad. And I grew up with- I was the youngest of eight children. Two of my siblings were married when I was born, but there were six of us at home.  So it was very difficult for my father to have a housekeeper because it- you could image what it was like with six children, all different ages and sizes. So, but anyhow. I went to a one-room school when I started first grade. [Pause] It was very lonesome for me because my brothers- the youngest of my brothers and sisters was a boy- was my brother and he was four years older than I. So I had- it was very difficult. I had very few playmates. So I had to entertain myself most of the time. And I just sorta roamed around over the farm.

 

00:02:52

Laughlin:

Did you like living on the farm?

 

00:2:55

Oakey:

Well it wasn’t like- really like a farm because we didn’t have livestock and I don’t think- I don’t remember if we had- I don’t believe we had any chickens or anything like that. We just lived there. My grandfather divided his farm three ways to each three of children property. And so, ours- our part of the farm was unique in that it had a small coalmine. There was a lot of bituminous coal in that part of Pennsylvania. And mining was a pretty popular occupation. So, but anyhow. We didn’t use the coalmine and it just sat there and boarded up. I know my father worried that we’d decide that we’d want to see what was inside. [Chuckles] But we never did. But anyhow, when the farm passed from our family into someone else’s they sold coal. It was quite bit of coal in the mine- in this little mine. I don’t know whatever happened to the farm I guess it just sat there, you know. No one except the coalmine company had anything to do with it.

 

00:05:05

Laughlin:

When your father- grandfather divided the land into three parts and split it up between his children, did the other family live on the land near you?

 

00:05:24

Oakey:

Yes, my aunt and my uncle both and their families lived there on the farm.

 

00:05:36

Laughlin:

Did you see them much?

 

00:05:38

Oakey:

Yeah, they- yes they- their children was- well some of them were around the same ages as my brothers and sisters. So, they were around the farm quite a bit

 

00:05:59

Laughlin:

Do you remember any of your family members being specifically close to you?

 

00:06:07

Oakey:

No see, the youngest one was four years older and we didn’t have a whole lot in common. It was a brother.

 

00:06:29

Laughlin:

Tell me about your parents? What are their names and where are they from?

 

00:06:34

Oakey:

Well, my father was John. His name was John. And he had a second name but he never mentioned it. I guess he didn’t like it that much [Chuckles] but anyhow. My mother was- her name was Sarah Armenda and they were from the same area. My family settled there in 1736 or ’38. They came to America from Switzerland, my father’s family. And my mother’s family was English and they came in 1683. So they were early settlers.

 

00:07:40

Laughlin:

What area was that, where they settled?

 

00:07:42

Oakey:

My father’s family, it was 17- it was either 17- there were two waves of Amish people came to America: One in 1736 and one in 1738. But I don’t know for sure which. We- our history- we have a history of documented history. But I haven’t looked at it in years.

 

00:08:25

Laughlin:

Let’s talk about your childhood and growing up. What was your favorite thing to do when you were young?

 

00:08:34

Oakey:

Well, when I was very young my favorite thing was making mud pies. I used to make mud pies everyday. There was a little creek that ran behind our house and it was just perfect for mud pies. You could just, you know, get lots of mud and water. And I asked my father if I could put a mud pie in the oven and he said sure. And I didn’t stop with one pie I just- the whole oven had to be cleaned because I had mud all over the place. But anyhow. And I used to love to go in the orchard. We had an- our part of the farm also had an orchard. And my brother used to get the saltshaker and go to the orchard and eat green apples. And we, luckily, we never really got sick. But if we’d ever had that would’ve been something. I started mud pies, I guess I was- I used to just like to just roam around. I just I had no playmates. It was very rare that I had someone to play with. And so, I just sorta roamed around, and I don’t know, mostly I made the mud pies. And I used to sit under a tree. There was a lane that went past the farm. There was a great big tree up there and I used to sit under the tree and play with whatever was there: acorns or whatever.

 

00:10:51

Laughlin:

When you went to school, did you like going to school?

 

00:10:57

Oakey:

Well, my first year I went to the one-room school. And then my father decided that maybe- by that time my older sister, one of my older sister had- had two sisters. And the one was married. She lived in town, in this little town. So, my father thought it’d be better if I went to school in town. So for the second grade and from there on I went to school in town. So I didn’t- it wasn’t such a hardship getting me to and from school in the winter.

 

00:11:51

Laughlin:

Tell me about the town. What was that like?

 

00:11:56

Oakey:

It was very small. And it had- it was unique in that it had it’s name- it derived it’s name from three rivers. Threes small rivers that came together to form one river in the town, they went through the town. The one was the- there was the Casselman, the Laurel Hill Creek, and the Yakagany. And they came together in this little town. And it formed a turkey foot, it looked like a foot, you know an animals or a turkey’s foot. So it was upper and lower Turkey Foot townships. They had townships there in- and it was called, I lived in Lower Turkey Foot Township. And then there was an Upper Turkey Foot Town. But I thought that was rather unique. But it was just a small- I think there was about 1,000 people that lived in the town. And they were mostly railroad people and the people that worked on the railroad. ‘Cuz there were two railroads there, two different ones. I don’t remember anything else that was bein’ seen at all. Just a regular routine of going to school everyday and coming home.

 

00:14:13

Laughlin:

How did you get to school?

 

00:14:15

Oakey:

Oh I walked.  They didn’t have buses. They didn’t get school buses until I was maybe in the eighth grade or ninth grade.

 

00:14:28

Laughlin:

The people that lived in the town were they mostly white or were there other kinds of people there?

 

00:14:35

Oakey:

They were mostly white. It was unique in that there were no Catholics in the town. It’s in the mountains so very few people settled- mostly old families. You know, early settlers.

 

00:15:10

Laughlin:

Did you find your childhood to be difficult in any way?

 

00:15:16

Oakey:

Yes, growing up without a mother is very difficult I think. I knew from the time I was very young that mine was different- that my life was different from the others. Most of my- all of my other friends had mothers that were there and they were in the house, you know. When you went in the mother was always there. And in my house there was many times there was no one. Just, you know, just I was by myself. And as I said before it was very difficult for my father because he had to work. And he tried housekeepers and they just wouldn’t stay. There’s just too many kids. ‘Cuz there was six: three boys and three girls, all different ages. And then my father died when I was fourteen. I think fourteen or fifteen. Then I went to live with an older brother who had children my age, which was very nice. He had a daughter one year behind me in school and so it was like having a family again, you know. There was somebody in- there was always- the mother was in the house. When you came home she was there and she was- even though she was a sister-in-law actually. She was very, very good to me. She was wonderful.  She saw to it that I had clothes and everything, you know. Her daughter, my niece, was just- she’s just a year behind me in school and so there was someone close to my age that, you know, I could sorta- I could identify with.

 

00:18:02

Laughlin:

Where did your brother live?

 

00:18:04

Oakey:

Well, he lived in a mining town. He was a mechanic in the mines. He repaired those very complicated coal cutters. So, he lived- they lived in this mining town. I went to school, to high school, there. And I graduated from high school at this little town.

 

00:18:54

Laughlin:

Do you remember what that was called?

 

00:18:56

Oakey:

Yes, it’s Banther. Banther, Pennsylvania. It’s in Green County.

 

00:19:13

Laughlin:

Did you see many of your other family members when you went to go live with your brother?

 

00:19:18

Oakey:

Yes, I saw them quite often.

 

00:19:25

Laughlin:

What did you do after high school?

 

00:19:29

Oakey:

Well after high school, I got a job in- at the state capital in Harrisburg. And I worked as a secretary for the Secretary of the Executive- I was secretary to the Executive Secretary for the Medical and Dental Boards (the state boards). And I worked there until I married and I married when I was twenty-one.

 

00:20:07

Laughlin:

What was it like working there?

 

00:20:09

Oakey:

Very interesting really. Very, very interesting. ‘Cuz they licensed the doctors, dentists, and then the- what is called the Allies Arc Site (physiotherapy and the entire practicing pharmacy). They licensed all those different allied, you know, the ones that are medically related.

 

00:21:08

Laughlin:

When you lived in Harrisburg and you worked for this company- or for the boards, what kind of place did you live in?

 

00:21:19

Oakey:

Well, there was in Harrisburg- there’s this street called Front Street. And it’s right on the- close to the water. The Susquehanna River runs through Harrisburg. And the Front Street was the street where all the mansions were. And then when the crash came, the market crash came in 1929, most of the people who lived in the mansions lost their money. And the mansions were all there so they, for most of them, made apartments out of ‘em. And I lived in one of the mansions. The first one I lived in was called the Bolton Mansion. Then I lived in another one and I remember talking to a lady that lived in the apartment on the first floor. And she said that she used to attend fabulous balls in that room, the very room that she lived in, when she was young. But everyone had plenty of money and they did a lot of entertaining. And she was very interesting, you know. She told me a lot about what the mansions were like when she- before the crash.

 

00:23:38

Laughlin:

What kind of changes did it bring to your life?

 

00:23:43

Oakey:

Oh, it gave me a whole new life because it- you can’t imagine what it was like for someone who lived in a little town- in a coalmining town, to go to the city when I had never been anywhere. And I was as green and grass. It was really- it was an education in itself. But it was very nice- I enjoyed- that’s a very nice part of my life being on my own and learning all those ideas. And I met my husband there. So that was- that was nice.

 

00:24:51

Laughlin:

You met in Harrisburg?

 

00:24:53

Oakey:

Mhm. He worked for- he had a job with the state also. He worked for the same department I did. And that’s how we met.

 

00:25:18

Laughlin:

After you were married, did you still work for the same place you did before you were married?

 

00:25:40

Oakey:

Yes, for a while. Then, World War II came along and my husband went to work for the federal government rather than the state government. And he was transferred from close to Middletown to Rome, New York. There was an air base there and he was transferred there so we moved to New York state.

 

00:26:23

Laughlin:

Was this in 1941?

 

00:26:27

Oakey:

Yeah, ’41 or ’42. We were married in February of 1941 and the war started. I remember the day that war was declared. And it was a Sunday. I was listenin’ to a symphony and all of a sudden they broke through the symphony, you know they stop. And they said that we had declared war on Germany and you know. Then, I lived there for about three years. About three years, yeah, that the war was being fought.

 

00:27:51

Laughlin:

You said that your husband enlisted.

 

00:27:54

Oakey:

Yes, he enlisted in the marines.

 

00:27:59

Laughlin:

Do you know why he enlisted?

 

00:28:03

Oakey:

Yes. He wanted to do what he could.

 

00:28:18

Laughlin:

So you lived in Rome, New York during the majority of the war. What kind of place was that like?

 

00:28:29

Oakey:

It’s just your average, not a real small town. It was- I don’t know what it’s like now. But, at that time it was just a regular, maybe I don’t know how many people was in the- that lived in the town. But it was just a regular, medium sized town, I guess.

 

00:29:16

Laughlin:

What kinds of people lived there?

 

00:29:18

Oakey:

Well, there were a lot Italian people lived there.

 

00:29:33

Laughlin:

Do you know what kind of neighborhood they lived in? Where they all in one neighborhood?

 

00:29:41

Oakey:

Well, they were just a regular- it was your average town where different neighborhoods, you know. [Pause] We lived in government housing. I lived in government housing and then when my husband went into- went to the Marine Corps, I moved into an apartment in Utica.

 

00:30:38

Laughlin:

What kind of area was that apartment located in?

 

00:30:41

Oakey:

That was on Genesee Street. That was one of- it was a huge- an old apartment house. Genesee Street was one of the more- I guess it was more residential than anything else

 

00:31:18

Laughlin:

Were there a lot of families living there?

 

00:31:22

Oakey:

Yeah, there were a number of pretty large apartment houses. They were also- had also been, I suppose, mansions. Because they weren’t built like your regular apartment houses, you know. [Pause] Utica was known for manufacturing. They have the Revere Copper and Brass Manufacturing there and various factories. And the streets were named for the Indian tribes, a lot of them. Like they had the Algonquian and the Genesee. Um, I’m trying to think of the other names. Mohawk, you know. There were, I think there were, some like five Indian tribes that lived in and north of New York State. I know the Mohawk River- I was surprised. I thought it would be something very special because of the movie, you know “Drummed along the Mohawk.” [Laughs] And it was- it ran behind the house where I lived. And it was just a little stream. It wasn’t very big at all. It wasn’t what I expected

 

00:33:40

Laughlin:

The factories, like the Copper and Brass, did the manufacture things for the war?

 

00:33:52

Oakey:

I don’t know really. I don’t think so much.

 

00:34:03

Laughlin:

Let’s go ahead and take a break.

 

[Break in recording]

 

00:34:08

Laughlin:

When you lived in Rome, New York what was your life like?

 

00:34:13

Oakey:

Well, it was [Pause]. Of course there was the war going on and we felt the war a lot- much, much more than the wars that- like the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. I mean they’re far away. They don’t affect us so much. When World War II- you were part of it. You seemed like you were part of it. There was the rationing and the sadness of people losing loved ones. It was just different, very much different. It was hard to get some, you know, some things like butter, sugar, flour, and that sort of thing. And that alone wouldn’t have been too bad, but there was just always somebody losing somebody. That, you know. And then people that you knew, like people you went to school with, and they didn’t come back from the war. That was very sad. It was really- it really took a toll.

 

00:36:21

Laughlin:

Tell me more about the rationing and how it affected your life?

 

00:36:26

Oakey:

Well, then I did not have any children or I was just all by myself. You just couldn’t get an awful lot of the things that you were really, you know, you were used to.

 

00:37:00

Laughlin:

What was your married life like?

 

00:37:04

Oakey:

Well, my husband was in the Marines most of the time during the war and so, I only saw him once in a great while and when he came home. But I remember when he came home from boot camp. While he was in boot camp he’d write me these letters and tell me how, you know, what was going on. And I envisioned when he came home from boot camp he’d be all cut and bruised, you know. Wow! He looked so good and he had lost a little weight and he looked very, very good. And when I- well I guess he would tell me the truth about how hard it was. But, it was really- I was really amazed. I didn’t expect to see him looking so good.

 

00:38:14

Laughlin:

Where was he when he was gone?

 

00:38:17

Oakey:

Oh he went to- well first he went to Paris Island after they get there- that’s where he got his boot camp training. And then he went to North Carolina, but he was very fortunate in a way. He didn’t go overseas. He stayed right in the states. I think he did something. He had been working-he had been managing one of the warehouses at the Griffith Air Force Base before he went into the service. And I think that probably- the probably needed him for that sort of thing, rather than send him overseas. So, he didn’t go overseas at all.

 

00:39:36

Laughlin:

What was your social life like?

 

00:39:39

Oakey:

Well, I had- there were some other people who were in the same situation as I was. We used to socialize. We used to get together and you know. There wasn’t a whole lot you could do. That was – that we’d get together and go to dinner, maybe play cards or something like that.

 

00:40:19

Laughlin:

Did you ever go to the movies?

 

00:40:22

Oakey:

Yeah, there was a lot of- yeah in Utica there were several. And they had a very good concert season. And I used to go to the concerts. They had- Utica was at that time; I don’t know what it is like now. That’s been a long, long time ago. But, at that time they used to try out the plays and things like that for New York because of the audience in Utica. It was rather unique. They were very critical.  And if it passed in Utica it would pass anywhere. So, they had a very good concert season. And I remember seeing several famous opera tenors there. I saw my first opera in Utica. It was “La Traviata.” I remember I had- I was familiar with the music and so forth, but I had never really seen- I never attended an opera before. And it was something- it was very outstanding in my life. I was crying at the end of the first half I was so happy. My friend’s mother was Italian and didn’t speak English. She saw me, she saw the tears in my eyes, and she said to my friend, “why is she crying, doesn’t she like it?” And she said, “Oh no, she loves it she just gets emotional.”

 

00:43:08

Laughlin:

Why do you think the audiences at Utica were so critical?

 

00:43:12

Oakey:

Well, a lot of them were Italian. And I don’t know what it’s like now, but then they still had that- Opera to the Italians and the Europeans isn’t what it is to us. People shy away from opera. But that’s what they did. They went to opera and they liked ‘em. And I think a lot of people would like opera too if they gave it a chance. They don’t- if they just- someone singing and they think “oh dear, this is awful.” You know, but it really isn’t- it’s beautiful. You have to learn to understand it.

 

00:44:24

Laughlin:

Do you have a passion for music?

 

00:44:26

Oakey:

I do.

 

00:44:30

Laughlin:

What kinds of things did you do during the war? What kinds of things did you go see?

 

00:44:49

Oakey:

Well, there wasn’t a whole- the movies. We used to go to the movies a lot. Then, during the concert season, there was the opera. There were several operas. And there would be symphonies. We mostly had the movies and as I said the opera season. That’s all I remember.

 

00:45:48

Laughlin:

When your husband was in North Carolina did you visit him often?

 

00:45:58

Oakey:

Let’s see, I went to- I visited him one time for about a week. I took a week off. I was working too, you know. And you couldn’t get time off. Not during the war. Usually you couldn’t get that much time off. Then, when he was about to be discharged I worked at the Marine Corps base for I think six months before. I worked for the government while I waited for him to be discharged so we could go home.

 

00:47:15

Laughlin:

What did you do there?

 

00:47:17

Oakey:

Oh I was a secretary.

 

00:47:21

Laughlin:

Oh what office?

 

00:47:29

Oakey:

Oh, just a secretary. Somebody who, you know, typed and did that sort of thing

 

00:47:44

Laughlin:

Did you move down to North Carolina?

 

00:47:47

Oakey:

Just for the six months.

 

00:47:52

Laughlin:

What kind of community was that like?

 

00:47:55

Oakey:

Mostly, well I lived right off the base. So, it was just a little town called Morehead. And then there’s New Bern. [Pause] The housing was very short. I didn’t have an apartment or anything like that. I just had a room and there was a young family. They had a little baby, a little boy. They had an extra room. So, I rented that room and I lived with them while I was waiting for my husband to serve his last six months.

 

00:49:22

Laughlin:

When you first heard that we were at war, on the radio, what did you know about Pearl Harbor?

 

00:49:50

Oakey:

Oh, I was listening to a symphony and all of a sudden they broke in and they said that the Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor. They were telling all of us. Telling all about, you know. And I was just stunned I didn’t know what- I was all myself. My husband had gone to help a friend of ours move her stuff. She was gonna stay with us for about two or three days until she could get a place of her own. And then he went to help her bring her things to our apartment. They were coming up the stairs to our apartment and they were laughing. And here I was. I was sitting in this little living room we had listening to all of this stuff about Pearl Harbor. And I thought how could they laugh? We were at war. I just couldn’t figure it out, you know. But they didn’t even know it was- and I said that “didn’t you know we declared war the Japanese?” And they said, “no!” And I said, “well it’s been on the radio.” And then we just sat and listened a while and it was, you know, like when something like that happens, they just do it over, and over, and over again, you know. And we just sat and listened.

 

00:52:00

Laughlin:

What kinds of things did you learn about during the war about the war?

 

00:52:19

Oakey:

The uncertainty of war, you know. Like, just the high school with- his brother was a colonel and he was second lieutenant. And he was serving in Europe. He was just this guy that I had known very, very well. And his brother, the colonel, was waiting for- he was on a mission, you know. He had, liked they called the mission, fly out and do whatever they had to do. And he was waiting for his brother, the second lieutenant, to come back from the mission. Because he had his first lieutenant wings for him and he was gonna surprise him. And he never came back. He was killed and things like that you had to live with, you know. There was always somebody you knew that was getting the bad news that something had happened to their- they were either wounded or were killed in the war. But that was really very sad. It was a time that was different. So different from what you were used to, you know.

 

00:54:46

Laughlin:

Did you learn about what was going on in Germany?

 

00:54:55

Oakey:

Yes, about Hitler and- that was almost too much.

 

00:55:15

Laughlin:

Can you tell me about the things that you learned either through media or through other people?

 

[Pause}

 

00:55:39

Oakey:

I just don’t know where to start.

 

00:55:43

Laughlin:

Did you- did they tell you about the concentration camps?

 

00:55:50

Oakey:

Yes. I have a brother-in-law who served in World War II. And he was with the ones liberated Dachau, which was a very, very bad prison camp.

 

00:56:30

Laughlin:

What do you know of that?

 

00:56:32

Oakey:

And he had nightmares when he came home from the service. From what he saw and what happened, you know when they were liberating at Dachau.

 

00:56:52

Laughlin:

Did he ever tell you about what he saw?

 

00:56:56

Oakey:

No, he had very bad nightmares and you know. I guess he didn’t want to talk about it. But he was with the one who went in and liberated. And I guess what they saw was just unbearable.

 

00:57:33

Laughlin:

Did you feel like you knew what was going on?

 

00:57:36

Oakey:

Oh yes. Yes. [Pause} And so many- I know I had- my niece was married to someone had a very bad breakdown. And he was in the South- he was in the Pacific. And he was serving in the Pacific and he- back home his father was pretty old and they had a farm. And his father couldn’t manage the farm, so they asked to have him discharged with, would do you call, I forget. There’s a name for it. Anyhow, when you could be discharged if there’s a need at home, like to manage the farm or something like that. And he came home and he said that he just couldn’t understand why he came home and all his buddies had to stay there and endure, you know, what was going on in the South Pacific. It was- it must’ve been pretty bad. So, anyhow. He had this breakdown and it was right before Christmas. And he was so bad they had to put him in a psychiatric hospital. And it took him from right before Christmas until almost September of the next- of that year, you know like the New Year, to recover. Because he just couldn’t see why could come home and leave all that and all of his buddies and everybody there to fight. It was just too much for him.

 

01:00:54

Laughlin:

Is there any significant moment you remember most about the war?

 

01:01:13

Oakey:

No, I don’t- there wasn’t. There’s so many things. It’s very hard to explain how, you know, how it was.

 

01:01:33

Laughlin:

Where were you living when the war ended?

 

01:01:35

Oakey:

Oh I was at- we were having this picnic on the base. And that’s when we heard all the bells ringing. And people shouting and it was just- you just knew there was something important happened. And it was when the Japanese finally gave up.

 

01:02:13

Laughlin:

Did things change much after that?

 

01:02:17

Oakey:

Yeah, I think they did. I know my husband came home and went right back to work for the Air Force. And that’s when we lived in- again we lived in government housing on the base. It was all the temporary houses.

 

01:03:09

Laughlin:

Looking back on the war now, how do you reflect on that time?

 

01:03:18

Oakey:

Well, it was compared to just- compared to your life before the war and then going through the war, and then after. It took a long time to get back into being without war again. You know, you get used to living a certain way. And it was very difficult to get back to knowing that. And of course we weren’t out of World War II that long before we had the Korean War. So, you really couldn’t settle down to, you know, not having war.

 

01:04:34

Laughlin:

Would you like to say anything or mention anything that we might have missed?

 

01:04:43

Oakey:

No. I think we covered it. What do you think?

 

01:04:48

Laughlin:

I think we did pretty good. Thank you

 

[End recording]

 

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